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The SEIA recently announced the top 10 solar states in the country with California leading the way.

The solar industry has shown steady growth in the past few years, and one reason is the rising interest of residents looking at solar photovoltaic (PV) equipment, reported the Liberty Voice. Renewable energy sources are gaining popularity, and education on how systems work, while debunking myths, has increased Americans' knowledge on solar power.

The Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA) recently released a new infographic ranking the top 10 solar states in the U.S. by investigating how many megawatts of solar were added, and each state's total capacity.

Here are the top three states for solar power:

1. California
There's no real surprise that California leads the U.S. in solar, and it's a great example of how renewable energy can be a viable option. According to the SEIA, California installed 2,745.8 megawatts in 2013, which is the equivalent of powering 607,689 homes. The state installed half of all its solar capacity in 2013, which, according to Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Spectrum, as of March 7, 2014, pushed the total solar capacity to more than 5.2 gigawatts setting a new record for solar power generation.

California has several solar initiatives to get residents and businesses involved in the industry. According to the source, the state has a goal to reach 33 percent renewable energy by 2020.

"This shows that California is making remarkable progress in not only getting new resources approved and connected to the grid, but making meaningful contributions in keeping the lights on as well," Steve Berberich, president and CEO of the California Independent System Operator, said in a statement, according to IEEE Spectrum.

2. Arizona
While the second-place state has an estimated 2,000 MW less than California, Arizona is still becoming a leader in new solar power production. According to SEIA, Arizona installed 700.7 MW of new solar energy in 2013, which is the equivalent of powering 126,894 homes in the state.

Arizona's total electricity generated by solar panels in 2014 will save enough water to fill 25,000 swimming pools. While solar power is helping the state save on energy bills, it's also saving massive amounts of water in an area that is prone to droughts and water conversation mandates.

Arizona also saw the second-most clean energy jobs created during the fourth quarter of 2013, reported Environmental Entrepreneurs, according to KTAR-FM.

"For all of 2013, we saw more than 78,000 clean energy and clean transportation jobs announced in almost every state in the country," Bob Keefe, the communications director for E2, told KTAR-FM. "These are jobs that are everything from making the parts to installations, companies and big utility grade solar farms that you're seeing across Arizona these days."

3. North Carolina
One of the fastest-growing states in solar energy is North Carolina, and it installed 335.4 MW in 2013, which is the equivalent of powering 31,809 homes, reported SEIA. Data centers are growing extremely popular in North Carolina, and the amount of energy produced in 2013 was enough to power 213,000 computers.

There is no single reason behind the continuing growth of solar in North Carolina. Rather, a number of factors such as adequate policies, a responsive industry and research and development expertise in the state are attracting significant solar investment, reported The Energy Collective.

North Carolina is seeing industries such as universities, the growing military presence and the increasing high tech commerce take off in the state. Solar energy is available to take advantage of these growing industries and power them in an eco-friendly way. According to the source, many North Carolinians are realizing how solar can help as the state continues to build from its early achievements amid a recovering economy.

To learn more on how towns across the nation are benefiting by installing solar power systems, visit SunWize's website.

Most of 2013's renewable energy jobs are related to solar.

The solar power industry continued to create jobs in 2013, according to a survey by Environmental Entrepreneurs (E2) - a non-partisan community of business leaders who promote environmental policies. The survey revealed more than 20,000 solar jobs came into existence in the last year – 13,000 of those jobs were created in the fourth quarter of 2013 and originated from more than 70 solar projects.

While the total number of jobs made in 2013 through solar was fewer than in 2012, E2 believes 2014 could see a major uptick in growth, given demand and supportive policy. 

"Our report makes it clear," said E2 executive director Judith Albert. "When we invest in clean energy and clean transportation, we put people to work in every corner of the country. Whether it's a new wind farm in Iowa, an energy efficiency retrofit in Massachusetts, or a utility-scale solar array in Nevada, these projects require American ingenuity and labor. The sector is helping stimulate our economy."

E2 looked through a total of 260 major solar projects across the U.S. The military was responsible for many of them. In fact, 120 jobs alone were created in New Jersey for a project installing photovoltaic equipment on McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst​ – a military base.

The top states for producing solar energy jobs were California, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, Illinois, Nevada, Oregon, New York and Missouri. In total, 46 states added renewable energy jobs in 2013. California by itself accounted for 15,400 new renewable energy-related jobs.

The climate action plan
According to the E2 report, one of the biggest changes to the solar jobs scene was the Climate Action Plan, which establishes new standards for carbon pollution emitted by U.S. power plants. E2 estimates the impact on 2013 jobs for the action plan was small because the standards have not yet been finalized. The standards, however, are likely to have ripple effects in future years as power companies find new and affordable ways to offset their carbon emissions through clean energy.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is in charge of developing updated carbon emission standards, slated for release in June 2014. It will be up to each individual state to implement those standards. E2 predicts states will – in order to comply with emissions standards - require a more robust renewable energy infrastructure.

State lawmakers approve of clean energy
State leaders are already beginning to step up their renewable energy game in face of 2014's impending carbon emission standards, according to the source. Iowa, for example, was recently granted $1.03 million by the federal government to promote the installation of photovoltaic equipment in homes and businesses.

"As a leader in wind energy and renewable fuels, Iowa should be at the front of the pack in implementing programs that encourage the use of solar energy as well," Gov. Terry Branstad said while announcing the grant.

Iowa plans on adding 300 MW of solar PV in the next five years, which will create 2,500 jobs, E2 reported.

How Minnesota is promoting a solar economy
Although not a top state, Minnesota is still contributing to solar jobs by encouraging the growth of its solar energy through programs that emphasize the development of local solar companies. Minneapolis's solar energy incentive program, Made in Minnesota, became over-subscribed, according to Minneapolis NBC affiliate KARE. The program connects state solar companies with Minnesota residents who want to install solar on their property.

According to Commerce Commissioner Mike Rothman, the program was sold out so fast that the submissions made in January and February will be selected via a lottery system, KARE reported.

"It's a phenomenal success," Rothman said at the Solar Powering Minnesota conference in St. Paul. "It just shows the increasing demand and sort of what's at the ready."

There is also a new law that requires utilities to produce 1.5 percent of their electricity through solar by 2020, according to KARE.

One model for Minnesota to follow is Germany, according to Minh Le, director of the U.S. Department of Energy's solar technologies office.

"When I look out the window today it's overcast, but I'm often reminded that even though this is the northernmost state in the continental United States, you boast more sunlight than the country of Germany," he said. "Germany has installed more solar in the past decade than any other country in the world."

Arizona is aiming for number one in solar jobs
A recent article in the Phoenix Business Journal discussed the reasons why Arizona is still behind on solar compared to California. Arizona currently ranks second in solar jobs and installations, according to the source.

Bernadette Del Chiaro, executive director of the California Solar Energy Industries Association, argues that the reason California is doing better than Arizona is California's more aggressive renewable energy standard. California aims to have 33 percent of energy generated by renewable sources come 2020, compared to Arizona's goal of having 15-percent renewable energy by 2025. She believes that power companies in California will save more money in the future by investing in solar today.

"People want to save money," Del Chiaro told the Phoenix Business Journal.

To learn more on how towns across the nation are benefiting by installing solar power systems, visit SunWize's website.

Virginia has made major progress with its new solar laws.

Virginia has a poor track record when it comes to embracing solar energy, but that is starting to change, according to Renewable Energy World. Proposed legislation aims to promote Virginia as a new hot spot for the solar industry.

Bills in Virginia aim for the sun
According to Power for the People (PFP), some of these energy bills have passed through the House or the Senate. However, many have not yet been voted on.

Some of the new laws include an investment tax credit (ITC) for solar energy. This bill is still waiting on the voting processes before it passes, but it looks promising, according to PFP. So far, it has passed the Senate but not the House, and advocates have begun an email campaign to alert House members to its importance and relevance to Virginia. The bill is called HB​ 910, and it was introduced by Delegate Ron Villanueva​, R-Virginia Beach.

Other bills have already passed. For example, there is no longer a ban preventing solar from being installed on homes that belong to home owners associations, according to PFP. This bill is called SB 222, and it was started by Rep. Chap Petersen D-Fairfax.

In the past, members of a home owners association weren't allowed to install solar, but now they can so long as the HOA doesn't specifically ban solar equipment.

Additionally, solar systems have been redefined as pollution control equipment. This allows for a tax incentive, as previously the equipment was considered machinery and tools, which is a different tax category. The bills for this law were SB 418 and HB 1239, introduced by Sens. Emmett Hanger, R-Mount Solon, and Tim Hugo, R-Fairfax.

Solar is making small steps in Virginia
According to News Leader, the redefinition of solar systems as "pollution control equipment" was a major game changer because it makes solar much more affordable.

The legislation had taken two years to enact because it was continually rejected by lawmakers until this year.

"It's a step in the right direction as we become more focused on environmental concerns," said Hanger.

The success behind the bill lay in getting together a number of stakeholders, Republicans and Democrats alike, and forming ties with solar companies and environmentalist groups.

Although a true state tax credit does not yet exist in Virginia, there was another bill, SB 653, that passed through the General Assembly. This bill is a $10 million renewable energy grant for fiscal year 2016. According to the bill, the grant would "equal 35 percent of the costs paid or incurred to place the renewable energy property into service, not to exceed $2.5 million for any individual piece of renewable energy property."

Still more to be done
Virginia is considered "coal country," however, there are still solar supporters who are making a difference, according to News Leader.

"There has been a good deal of success this year, and this focus on renewable energy was fortunate to have bipartisan support," said Corrina Beall, legislative coordinator for the Virginia chapter of the Sierra Club.

According to Environment and Energy Publishing, the U.S. grid that partly supplies electricity to Virginia, along with several other states in the Southeast, has the potential to switch to 30 percent renewable energy without any ill effects, assuming that PJM Interconnection (the power company running the grid) makes adequate preparations and investments.

"The study's main conclusion is that the PJM system, with adequate transmission expansion (up to $13.7 billion) and additional regulation reserves (up to an additional 1,500 MW), would not have any significant reliability issues operating with up to 30 percent of its energy (as distinct from capacity) provided by wind and solar generation," GE Energy, a consulting company, said.

PJM service territory covers 13 states, relying mostly on combustible fuels for much of its generative capacity.

To learn more about how businesses and government entities can start buying solar energy with no upfront costs, visit the SunWize website.

Virginia has made major progress with its new solar laws.

Virginia has a poor track record when it comes to embracing solar energy, but that is starting to change, according to Renewable Energy World. Proposed legislation aims to promote Virginia as a new hot spot for the solar industry.

Bills in Virginia aim for the sun
According to Power for the People (PFP), some of these energy bills have passed through the House or the Senate. However, many have not yet been voted on.

Some of the new laws include an investment tax credit (ITC) for solar energy. This bill is still waiting on the voting processes before it passes, but it looks promising, according to PFP. So far, it has passed the Senate but not the House, and advocates have begun an email campaign to alert House members to its importance and relevance to Virginia. The bill is called HB​ 910, and it was introduced by Delegate Ron Villanueva​, R-Virginia Beach.

Other bills have already passed. For example, there is no longer a ban preventing solar from being installed on homes that belong to home owners associations, according to PFP. This bill is called SB 222, and it was started by Rep. Chap Petersen D-Fairfax.

In the past, members of a home owners association weren't allowed to install solar, but now they can so long as the HOA doesn't specifically ban solar equipment.

Additionally, solar systems have been redefined as pollution control equipment. This allows for a tax incentive, as previously the equipment was considered machinery and tools, which is a different tax category. The bills for this law were SB 418 and HB 1239, introduced by Sens. Emmett Hanger, R-Mount Solon, and Tim Hugo, R-Fairfax.

Solar is making small steps in Virginia
According to News Leader, the redefinition of solar systems as "pollution control equipment" was a major game changer because it makes solar much more affordable.

The legislation had taken two years to enact because it was continually rejected by lawmakers until this year.

"It's a step in the right direction as we become more focused on environmental concerns," said Hanger.

The success behind the bill lay in getting together a number of stakeholders, Republicans and Democrats alike, and forming ties with solar companies and environmentalist groups.

Although a true state tax credit does not yet exist in Virginia, there was another bill, SB 653, that passed through the General Assembly. This bill is a $10 million renewable energy grant for fiscal year 2016. According to the bill, the grant would "equal 35 percent of the costs paid or incurred to place the renewable energy property into service, not to exceed $2.5 million for any individual piece of renewable energy property."

Still more to be done
Virginia is considered "coal country," however, there are still solar supporters who are making a difference, according to News Leader.

"There has been a good deal of success this year, and this focus on renewable energy was fortunate to have bipartisan support," said Corrina Beall, legislative coordinator for the Virginia chapter of the Sierra Club.

According to Environment and Energy Publishing, the U.S. grid that partly supplies electricity to Virginia, along with several other states in the Southeast, has the potential to switch to 30 percent renewable energy without any ill effects, assuming that PJM Interconnection (the power company running the grid) makes adequate preparations and investments.

"The study's main conclusion is that the PJM system, with adequate transmission expansion (up to $13.7 billion) and additional regulation reserves (up to an additional 1,500 MW), would not have any significant reliability issues operating with up to 30 percent of its energy (as distinct from capacity) provided by wind and solar generation," GE Energy, a consulting company, said.

PJM service territory covers 13 states, relying mostly on combustible fuels for much of its generative capacity.

To learn more about how businesses and government entities can start buying solar energy with no upfront costs, visit the SunWize website.

The new solar tariff in Minnesota helps solar users get a fair value for the energy they give back to the grid.

Minnesota recently reached a milestone in the ongoing net metering debate. The state has created a new way of measuring an individual's contribution to the energy grid, according to Midwest Energy News. It is called the "value of solar" tariff. It was only last year that Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton ordered the state's energy office to develop a formula for paying customers who fed solar energy back into the grid in a way that would be fair for solar users, non-solar users and the power companies.

"I think that consensus is really beginning to emerge," said Lynn Hinkle, policy director for the Minnesota Solar Energy Industries Association. "There's no doubt what happened today was a step forward."

The Minnesota Public Utilities Commission ultimately voted in favor of the proposal 3-2, so that has come into law. Utility companies in Minnesota across the state can apply the value-of-solar formula instead of the retail electricity rate when they estimate how much to pay a solar customer who feeds energy back into the grid. Previously, utilities could only use the retail rate, which they argued against because it paid more than what a power company would normally pay for energy. Utilities also argued the net metering rules unfairly make those who do not have solar more responsible for paying for grid infrastructure, because they cannot offset their power bills, which include the cost of electricity and the cost of maintaining the power grid.

How to measure the tariff
According to Midwest Energy News, debate about the tariff centered on how to put a price tag on the elimination of carbon emissions. There were three main options: established externality value, planning value and "social cost of carbon". The first was considered to be out of date. Planning value was created to help the Minnesota government calculate the future cost of complying with federal carbon emission regulations. This one was used in state estimations. Unfortunately, the planning value didn't correspond with what the commission considered to be the value of taking carbon out of the air for society's health and well-being, along with various environmental benefits to plants and animals.

The last option was to use the federal government's own figure, which the commissions calls the "social cost of carbon." Environmental groups were also in favor of using this because it takes into account the effect of carbon on the climate. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the "social cost of carbon" includes "net agricultural productivity, human health and property damages from increased flood risk," although the EPA adds that this number likely does not include all important damages and underestimates the effects of carbon emissions.

"The social cost of carbon is specifically focused on measuring what is the economic and health damage of emitting one more ton of carbon," said Erin Stojan Ruccolo, director of electricity markets for Fresh Energy, a local nonprofit dedicated to encouraging clean energy in Minnesota.

Calculating the value of solar
Bill Grant, Minnesota's deputy commissioner for energy, believes the formula accurately calculates the benefits each kilowatt hour of solar energy brings to Minnesota. Pragmatically, he also feels it incorporates all the costs and benefits of solar for everyone involved – including utility companies, according to Midwest Energy News.

"The goal as I see it with the value of solar is to find that point … at which everyone should be indifferent about whether this rate is imposed or not," Grant said.

How tariffs are playing out in Minnesota and elsewhere
One solar user is already reaping the benefits of the new solar tariff. Minnesota resident Matt Mattingly recently installed photovoltaic equipment as a way of saving money on his electricity bill, according to local ABC affiliate KAAL. When he uses less energy than his solar power system produces, the energy goes back into the grid, and he earns money for it based upon the new rules.

"I thought solar would be a great way to pre-pay some of my electrical costs," said Mattingly.

Austin, Texas, has been using a value of solar tariff since 2012. Called "value of solar tariff", or VOST by state lawmakers, it works in a way that is similar to Minnesota's tariff.  It incorporates multiple factors to determine the final payment back to the customer when they generate energy for the grid The factors include "loss savings, energy savings, generation capacity savings, fuel price hedge value, transmission and distribution capacity savings and environmental benefits," according to the Department of Energy

The Austin program's intent is to break even with the power utility company, so the final payment to the customer matches what the company would normally pay for energy at the wholesale price.

Austin Energy's solar incentive's Program Manager Leslie Libby said in a 2012 Greentech Media (GTM) article, when the program first started, it was not intended to give solar an advantage.

"What [VOST] is not, is an incentive," Libby said. "It is a credit applied to our customer's bill for bringing this valuable resource into our service territory. That resource has a value to Austin Energy and we are going to credit them for that value."

SunWize has helped Americans lower energy bills by installing smart solar power projects. To see how SunWize's customers have saved money with solar, visit the SunWize website.

Small towns in Massachusetts are beginning to purchase solar through various programs.

The town of Wellesley, Mass., is making a major solar energy push. Perhaps inspired by the solar panel installations at Wellesley College, local residents are also installing solar, according to The Wellesley Report.

Wellesley's Sustainable Energy Committee is having a kick off meeting on this subject on March 26 at a local elementary school. According to the committee, certain homes in the community should be able to generate enough solar energy to offer a 15 percent rate of return, which would allow the residents to pay back their solar installations within about five years. Additionally, people who sign up for the Solar Challenge program early will be given discounts. A group discount will also be offered, so the more people who sign up, the more cost-efficient each solar installation.

Massachusetts pushing for Solar
More than 24 different communities in Massachusetts have begun programs like the one found in Wellesley. In Lexington in late February, the board began accepting proposals from contractors to install photovoltaic equipment on local schools and municipal buildings. Needham, Mass., began its Solarize Needham project that same month, according to its website.

Similar projects have taken place in Portland, Ore., and Carrboro, N.C. The idea behind the project – leveraging group participation to lower the cost of solar – originated in Portland, and is still continuing there to this day.

In Wellesley, 12 residents have so far installed a solar power system. Needham, with 55 installations, recently joined Solarize Massachusetts, a move many expect will increase the number of their solar arrays. Lexington has 135, and Concord has over 200 – proof that solar is in demand.

The Sustainable Energy Committee's Phyllis Theerman believes that Wellesley can do better.

"Homes that are solar suitable solar have roofs facing east, south or west that get sun a good portion of the day," Theerman said. "A roof with few obstructions (skylights, chimneys) to laying out rows of solar panels is ideal."

Other solar towns
Residents of the South​ Coast area of Massachusetts are responding to another local solar challenge, according to SouthCoast Today. It's called the South​ Coast Energy Challenge, and encourages citizens to install solar systems on their homes and save on their electric bill.

Recently, members of the challenge did a tour of several Tri-Town homes that are powered with solar energy. The tour guide was Karen Stewart, assistant director of the South​ Coast Energy Challenge, and she led a group that consisted of curious citizens, environmentalists and local business leaders. The first tour took place in December of 2013, to little fanfare. But that's changed – now dozens of people take the tour and learn about clean energy, according to the source.

"Our goal is to connect people who are interested in solar with people who have solar and see where it leads," said Stewart.

Bob Lawrence, a member of the South​ Coast Energy Challenge, had first built his house without including solar. After taking the tour, he added a 36-panel photovoltaic system near his house in 2012, and it completely offsets his energy usage., according to SouthCoast Today.

The Energy challenge
While the South Coast Energy Challenge isn't exclusively focused on solar, it does include it as a major part. The program is part of a wider campaign to bring energy awareness to Massachusetts, help people save on their electricity bills and promote green living.

According to the energy challenge website, Massachusetts is one of the most progressive states when it comes to encouraging solar power.

Citizens of Massachusetts can benefit from power purchase agreements (PPAs), which allow them to get solar equipment without having to pay for it right away. With a PPA, a company runs​ the solar system for a small fee, which represents the payment for the installation and maintenance, and the customer will receive solar energy along with any excess power he or she needs from his or her electric company. The electric company will bill the customer along with the solar company, and the two bills together will be smaller than the original electric bill.

Additionally, according to the South​ Coast Energy Challenge site, residents of Massachusetts can benefit from solar renewable energy credits, while positively impacting the local economy.

South​ Coast residents extol the benefits of solar
One resident of Rochester, Mass., Mo Sperry, said she uses wood to heat her home in the winter, but expressed concern that she wouldn't be able to do so once she gets past a certain age, according to SouthCoast Today.

"I have my mother who is living with us and she is 96 years-old. If I live as long as her, I can't be lugging wood to heat my home," Sperry said. "We would ask ourselves 'What are we going to do next?'"

She decided to install a rooftop solar system and still heats her home with wood, which allows her to save on power by selling the excess energy back into the grid. In total, she saves about 60 percent on her electric bill.

Another resident of Rochester, Mass., Mary Jane Wheeler, said that she installed 40 solar panels on her home in 2012. She draws power from the grid during the winter, but saves money in the summer. Bill Saltonstall of Marion, Mass., also referred to the seasonal benefits of solar.

"You can bank your summer power toward the colder months ahead," he said.

To learn more on how towns across the nation are benefiting by installing solar power systems, visit SunWize's website.

Minnesota is the site for new solar co-ops.

Distributed solar can improve the economy of a location by becoming a community-based solar farm, according to the Institute for Self-Reliance.

Solar Co-ops in Minnesota
One solar farm in Minnesota is being funded by a neighborhood association in Prospect Park, according to the Minnesota Daily. The Prospect Park East River Road Improvement Association (PPERRIA) wants to build a solar garden (another term for a solar co-op) that will supply the local grid with energy and reduce customers' electric bills.

In 2013, Minnesota passed a law that required local Minnesota power company Xcel Energy to build a community solar garden program. The residents get credit for any power their portion of the solar co-op adds to the power grid.

Jessica Buchberger, the community engagement coordinator for PPERRIA, is optimistic that the solar garden will take off.

"Once people see how successful it's been in other neighborhoods, they'll be open to it," said Buchberger​, according to the Minnesota Daily.

In Mid-February, Minneapolis announced its first solar garden, according to AltEnergyMag. The solar co-op will work with local environmentalist groups Cool Planet and the Edina Foundation to recruit more customers who will buy into the program. Together, the three companies will inform the community about climate change and other green issues. The solar garden will be a way of keeping customers informed about the need to fight climate change.

The program promises to expand the number of people who would otherwise not have access to solar, according to the source. The community garden is located on top of a building on East Lake Street, and is available to anyone who subscribes to Xcel Energy.

Co-ops in Hawaii

There are also co-ops in Hawaii, such as the Anahola project, which is currently under construction. The solar co-op is expected to produce cheap solar energy while educating members about the benefits of solar.

"The project will provide not only the benefits of cheaper solar energy, but also economic benefits to the native Hawaiian community," said David Bissell, president and CEO of Kauai Island Utility Cooperative.

The Anahola project will have 59,000 solar panels and employ 150 workers, according to The Garden Island. The co-op will own the project for 25 years under a land-lease agreement, after which the ownership will transfer to the Department of Hawaiian Homelands (DHHL). The least desirable option after the transfer is that the grid will be dismantled. Another option is the co-op and the government could arrange for a power purchase agreement (PPA). Otherwise, the agency could use the power for a local grid.

The project will generate electricity that will cost 12.5 cents per kilowatt hour compared to 24 cents on the current energy grid, according to Electric Co-op today.

The project will have 12 megawatts in capacity and will be capable of powering 4,000 homes. The project includes a solar battery to help store energy for use during cloudy weather.

The project has been in the works since 2011, and is being built on the island of Kauai, which has established the goal of supplying 50 percent of all energy with renewable sources by 2023. There are two other large-scale solar projects on Kauai. Anahola will be one of the largest solar arrays of the Hawaiian Islands.

"This is a great project for Kauai and the Anahola community and I'm glad that we could partner with DHHL to make it happen," said Bissell. "The project will provide not only the benefits of cheaper solar energy but also economic benefits to the Native Hawaiian community."

SunWize has helped Americans lower energy bills by installing smart solar power projects. To see how Sunwize's customers have saved money with solar, visit the SunWize website.


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